Bureau of Meteorology

BOM Blog

Our blog offers an in-depth look at weather facts and science, using weather information and the ongoing work of the Bureau.

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Our social media conversation with you

Our blog will be a key part of our social media activity. You'll be able to read articles, find information and check out the multimedia we provide to share our work with you.

On our official Facebook page, we invite you to comment on articles, join in discussions and suggest topics you'd like to see us cover.

Over time we may explore other forms of social media. Right now, we're excited to be starting our social media conversation with you.

Our social media policy, terms and conditions sets out our plans for using Facebook and our posting policy.

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Contact our
Social Media Team at
socialmedia@bom.gov.au

Groundwater hydrochemistry—revealing the secrets of a hidden water resource

Groundwater hydrochemistry—revealing the secrets of a hidden water resource

Water is commonly thought of as just H2O, but groundwater contains a wide range of dissolved chemical elements from the surrounding environment. Most of these occur naturally, and many are present only in small quantities. These elements can tell us a lot about the source of the water, its quality and possible...

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Yarning about the weather

Yarning about the weather

Tess Davies loves to chat about Melbourne's temperamental weather—in fact, she's so passionate about it, she crocheted a large blanket documenting the city's daily temperatures for the whole of 2016. Tess' beautiful blanket celebrates the changeable face of Melbourne's weather: each coloured row represents...

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Explainer: what is 'precipitable water', and why does it matter?

Explainer: what is 'precipitable water', and why does it matter?

As the planet warms, rainfall and weather patterns will change. As temperatures rise, the amount of water in the atmosphere will increase. Some areas will become wetter, while others, like southern Australia, will likely be drier. One measure of atmospheric moisture is called 'precipitable water'. You may not...

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The 'Ekman transport' effect—cold water upwelling on Australian coastlines

The 'Ekman transport' effect—cold water upwelling on Australian coastlines

Have you ever gone to the beach to find the water much colder than the day before? A range of factors influence sea surface temperatures in coastal waters. This article looks at the 'Ekman transport' effect—a wind-driven process that brings colder water to the coastline. What is Ekman transport? Ekman...

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Science and gender equality: Women in weather

Science and gender equality: Women in weather

It’s been over 55 years since Barbara Daniel became the first woman to graduate from the Bureau’s Meteorology course—today’s Graduate Diploma in Meteorology—in August 1961. A profession previously dominated by men, meteorology and related fields such as climatology, hydrology and...

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