Bureau of Meteorology

BOM Blog

Our blog offers an in-depth look at weather facts and science, using weather information and the ongoing work of the Bureau.

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The BOM Blog gives you the background and insider info on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather—as well as the latest on the work of the Bureau.

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Feeling hot and bothered? It’s not the humidity, it’s the dew point

Feeling hot and bothered? It’s not the humidity, it’s the dew point

Do you sometimes feel much warmer than the actual observed temperature? ‘It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity’, right? Well not always—at higher temperatures that oppressive, muggy feeling (and frizzy hair) can actually be more about dew point than humidity. What is dew point? Dew...

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Tropical cyclones: just for the tropics?

Tropical cyclones: just for the tropics?

If you don’t live in Australia’s tropical zone, you might think tropical cyclones need only concern northerners—but it’s not quite as simple as that. While our tropics are most prone to the direct impact of tropical cyclones, they or their effects can be felt as far south as Perth on the...

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Research: how mountain waves can escalate bushfires

Research: how mountain waves can escalate bushfires

One of the most challenging situations in bushfire management is when a fire unexpectedly transforms from benign to severe. Understanding why past fires developed in unexpected ways could help to avoid this situation in the future. The Bureau has worked with the Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research...

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Groundwater hydrochemistry—revealing the secrets of a hidden water resource

Groundwater hydrochemistry—revealing the secrets of a hidden water resource

Water is commonly thought of as just H2O, but groundwater contains a wide range of dissolved chemical elements from the surrounding environment. Most of these occur naturally, and many are present only in small quantities. These elements can tell us a lot about the source of the water, its quality and possible...

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Yarning about the weather

Yarning about the weather

Tess Davies loves to chat about Melbourne's temperamental weather—in fact, she's so passionate about it, she crocheted a large blanket documenting the city's daily temperatures for the whole of 2016. Tess' beautiful blanket celebrates the changeable face of Melbourne's weather: each coloured row represents...

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