Bureau of Meteorology

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Climate ‘coconut wireless’ turns 100

Climate ‘coconut wireless’ turns 100

You might not think a recurring monthly meeting would be cause for an international celebration, but you can understand our excitement when you consider: it’s a 12-way international call; with shaky phone connections at the best of times; involving people in five different time zones; with lots of...

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Living and working on Willis Island

Living and working on Willis Island

Australia Day is an opportunity for us to celebrate all things Australian—whether you’re at home or abroad. While many of us might spend the day enjoying a barbeque with family and friends, playing backyard cricket or watching the tennis, Australia Day isn’t quite so conventional for Bureau...

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How are tropical cyclones named?

How are tropical cyclones named?

Tropical cyclones are named to provide ease of communication between the Bureau of Meteorology and the community. Names also raise the profile of the tropical cyclone, heightening public awareness and helping reduce confusion if multiple cyclones occur at the same time. The Bureau maintains a list of names,...

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Around the twist: Facts about tornadoes

Around the twist: Facts about tornadoes

A tornado and a twister are different names for the same type of weather event—a violently rotating column of air in contact with land or water. Tornadoes range in diameter from metres to hundreds of metres—some are even more than a kilometre—and can last from a few seconds up to half an hour or...

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Ruling the waves: How a simple wave height concept can help you judge the size of the sea

Ruling the waves: How a simple wave height concept can help you judge the size of the sea

Predicting the size of the wind-generated waves that roll in from the sea around Australia is not as hard as you might think—especially if you understand the concept of ‘significant wave height’. While fishing or out on the water you will experience a wide range of wave heights during your...

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