Bureau of Meteorology

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Giving you the background and inside information on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather.

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The BOM Blog gives you the background and insider info on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather—as well as the latest on the work of the Bureau.

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Explainer: How bushfire smoke can affect UV levels

Explainer: How bushfire smoke can affect UV levels

From time to time, eagle-eyed viewers notice blobs on our UV forecast maps, showing colours quite different from those around them. Often these are caused by bushfire smoke, which can absorb and reflect incoming radiation, reducing the UV predicted for the day ahead. UV and smoke: how does it work? Ultraviolet...

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Smashing the forecast: weather at the Australian Open

Smashing the forecast: weather at the Australian Open

The Australian Open, on now in Melbourne, is one of tennis' four prestigious Grand Slam events. It brings together two things the city is famous for—a passionate love of sport, and notoriously variable weather. And while players and spectators have their eyes on the ball, tournament organisers are...

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Explainer: 'bomb cyclones'—the intense winter storms that hit the US (and Australia too)

Explainer: 'bomb cyclones'—the intense winter storms that hit the US (and Australia too)

The eastern United States experienced a very severe winter storm last week, which caused damaging winds, heavy snow and the highest tide on record for Boston. Meteorologists call this type of storm a 'bomb cyclone', or simply a 'bomb'. But what is it? A 'bomb' is an old meteorological term for a low-pressure...

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Australia's climate in 2017: a warm year, with a wet start and finish

Australia's climate in 2017: a warm year, with a wet start and finish

The Bureau of Meterology’s Annual Climate Statement, released today, confirms that 2017 was Australia’s third-warmest year on record, and our maximum temperature was the second-warmest. Globally, 2017 is likely to be one of the world’s three warmest years on record, and the warmest year without an...

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Studying clouds over the Southern Ocean

Studying clouds over the Southern Ocean

It’s one of the mysteries of the vast Southern Ocean—what’s happening down there when it comes to clouds, rain, radiation from the sun and particles in the atmosphere? So we’ve joined forces with key Australian and US organisations to collect measurements. But why is this important—and...

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