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The BOM Blog gives you the background and insider info on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather—as well as the latest on the work of the Bureau.

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Catching the aurora

Catching the aurora

You do have to be pretty lucky to see an aurora, but if you do see one you won't be disappointed. Improve your chances with these tips from Bureau space weather expert Dr Jeanne Young. The brightest auroras are concentrated in rings called the aurora ovals around the north or south poles. The auroras in the...

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Not just sunburn: there's more to UV than meets the eye

Not just sunburn: there's more to UV than meets the eye

Australia has one of the highest levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the world, so we all need to understand how to avoid exposure and what it means for our health. And for a major hazard, UV has some surprises up its sleeve. Along with sunburn, it can cause eye damage and premature ageing—and not just in...

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Curious Kids: where do clouds come from and why do they have different shapes?

Curious Kids: where do clouds come from and why do they have different shapes?

This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children. The Conversation is asking kids to send in questions they’d like an expert to answer. All questions are welcome – serious, weird or wacky! See the end of the article for how to ask a question. Where do clouds come from and why do they all have...

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Why do we have different climates across Australia?

Why do we have different climates across Australia?

If you're travelling across Australia, you'll notice a huge variety in our terrain. The deserts around Alice Springs are different to the tropical wetlands of Kakadu or the temperate rainforests of Cradle Mountain. So why do these regions look and feel so different? The reason we have so many different...

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Spring is coming and there's little drought relief in sight

Spring is coming and there's little drought relief in sight

So far, 2018 has been very warm and exceptionally dry over large parts of mainland Australia. Our climate outlook for spring shows that significant widespread relief is unlikely. The chance of a spring El Niño, along with other climate drivers, is likely to mean below-average rainfall for large parts of the...

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