Bureau of Meteorology

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Giving you the background and inside information on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather.

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The BOM Blog gives you the background and insider info on weather, climate, oceans, water and space weather—as well as the latest on the work of the Bureau.

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Long-range forecasts: how are Climate Outlooks made?

Long-range forecasts: how are Climate Outlooks made?

Climate outlooks, also called long-range forecasts, tell us which way our weather will lean over the coming months or seasons: Wetter or drier than usual, hotter or colder, or no strong push either way. So, what information goes into them and how are they made? Climate outlooks can be powerful tools to help you...

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Seeing the water under our feet: groundwater in 3D

Seeing the water under our feet: groundwater in 3D

Flowing underground, groundwater is ‘out of sight, out of mind’ for many people. But this hidden resource is vital for communities in many parts of Australia—including some capital cities. To make the best use of groundwater, you need to understand where it is, how it moves and what’s around...

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Cold fronts: your questions answered

Cold fronts: your questions answered

They roll across the country from west to east, causing temperatures to plummet and often bringing rain, storms and strong wind. So why do they happen, how do we know how severe they'll be and how do Australia's compare to cold fronts elsewhere in the world? You asked the questions—here are the answers! To...

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Red sky at night: the science of beautiful sunsets

Red sky at night: the science of beautiful sunsets

'A red sky at night is a shepherd’s delight! A red sky in the morning is a shepherd’s warning.' Perhaps this saying came to mind if you caught a spectacular sunrise or sunset recently. Since biblical times and probably before, proverbs and folklore such as this developed as a way for societies to...

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Solstices and equinoxes: the reasons for the seasons

Solstices and equinoxes: the reasons for the seasons

For most of Australia, weather at the start and end of each year is generally warmer, and the middle of the year is cooler. Days are longer at the start and end of the year and shorter in the middle of the year. But why? Australia's seasons: how many and when? Four seasons? Australia's weather year is typically...

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